Triploid Syndrome

National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.

Skip to the navigation

It is possible that the main title of the report Triploid Syndrome is not the name you expected.

Disorder Subdivisions

  • None

General Discussion

Triploid Syndrome is an extremely rare chromosomal disorder. Individuals with triploid syndrome have three of every chromosome for a total of sixty-nine rather than the normal forty-six chromosomes. Babies with Triploid Syndrome usually are lost through early miscarriage. However, some infants have been born and survived as long as five months. Affected infants are usually small and have multiple birth defects. Those that survive are usually mosaic, meaning that some cells have the normal number of 46 chromosomes and some cells have a complete extra set of chromosomes.

Supporting Organizations

Genetic and Rare Diseases (GARD) Information Center

PO Box 8126
Gaithersburg, MD 20898-8126
Tel: (301)251-4925
Fax: (301)251-4911
Tel: (888)205-2311

UNIQUE - Rare Chromosome Disorder Support Group

G1 The Stables
Station Road West
Oxted, RH8 9EE
United Kingdom
Tel: 0044 (0)1883 723356

For a Complete Report

This is an abstract of a report from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD). For a full-text version of this report, go to and click on Rare Disease Database under "Rare Disease Information".

The information provided in this report is not intended for diagnostic purposes. It is provided for informational purposes only.

It is possible that the title of this topic is not the name you selected. Please check the Synonyms listing to find the alternate name(s) and Disorder Subdivision(s) covered by this report.

This disease entry is based upon medical information available through the date at the end of the topic. Since NORD's resources are limited, it is not possible to keep every entry in the Rare Disease Database completely current and accurate. Please check with the agencies listed in the Resources section for the most current information about this disorder.

Last Updated:  5/21/2008
Copyright  2003 National Organization for Rare Disorders, Inc.