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Quality Indicators

Rush-Copley is committed to providing the highest quality medical care possible. But, how can you determine what is considered quality care in a hospital or other healthcare setting? One way is through the government’s required reporting of outcomes through the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS). CMS has a website called Hospital Compare® that allows consumers to review results from hospitals for common conditions that require a hospital stay and how well that hospital performs them. Examples include care for patients admitted for heart attacks or pneumonia. This data can help guide your choice for hospital care since it reflects a number of patients not just the outcomes of one or two.

Another way to evaluate hospital quality and safety is through an additional government sponsored effort that aims to improve the quality, safety and affordability of healthcare for all Americans. As part of CMS' national Partnership for Patients campaign, the Illinois Hospital Association (IHA) has partnered with the American Hospital Association/Health Research and Educational Trust, also known as the Hospital Engagement Network (HEN) to reduce harm by 40 percent and hospital readmissions by 20 percent. The HEN collaboration provides training and assistance to individual hospitals that seeks to improve patient care and safety in 10 target areas. Rush-Copley is an active participant in all target areas and hospital representatives attend educational sessions, submit the data into a national database and monitor progress with feedback reports for continued improvement efforts.  Rush-Copley is please to be the first hospital in Illinois to meet all of the HEN requirements and goals as of July 30, 2013.

Readmissions

Reducing avoidable hospital readmissions is an opportunity to improve quality and reduce cost in the health care system.

Please note: Comparative data is based on the submission of information by each organization reporting within the Hospital Engagement Network. Rush-Copley is not responsible for the timeliness or accuracy of comparative data shown for any other organization represented.

Pressure Ulcers (Bedsores)

Preventing pressure ulcers or treating them once they occur improves the patient’s health by reducing pain and unnecessary treatments and decreasing length of stay. 

Falls with Injuries

Inpatient falls may be a significant cause of hospital-acquired injury, including fractures and head trauma.


Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections

Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections  (CAUTI) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality and is the second most common cause of secondary bloodstream infections. Over 600,000 patients each year develop urinary tract infections , and 80 percent of these infections are catheter-related.

Please note: During certain time periods, Rush-Copley may appear to have an increase in data reported for infections when compared to all state and other reporting organizations. This increase may seem significant but in fact only represents a very small number of cases.

Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections

Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections (CLBSI) occur when bacteria or viruses enter the bloodstream through a central line, causing infection.


Please note: During certain time periods, Rush-Copley may appear to have an increase in data reported for infections when compared to all state and other reporting organizations. This increase may seem significant but in fact only represents a very small number of cases.

Ventilator Associated Events

Ventilator Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is a lung infection that develops in a person who is on a ventilator, a machine that is used to help a patient breathe.



Please note: During certain time periods, Rush-Copley may appear to have an increase in data reported for infections when compared to all state and other reporting organizations. This increase may seem significant but in fact only represents a very small number of cases.

Surgical Site Infections

Surgical site infections occur after surgery in or on the part of the body where the surgery took place. Surgical site infections can be superficial involving just the skin or more serious involving tissues and organs.


Please note: During certain time periods, Rush-Copley may appear to have an increase in data reported for infections when compared to all state and other reporting organizations. This increase may seem significant but in fact only represents a very small number of cases.

Adverse Drug Events

Excessive anticoagulation with warfarin - inpatients

Medications are commonly associated with adverse events in hospitalized patients due to multiple medications and co-morbid conditions.  These can be reduced or eliminated through monitoring and prevention of specific medication errors.

Venous Thromboembolism

Venous Thromboembolism is a preventable condition that occurs when a blood clot breaks free and enters the arteries of the lungs.  

Obstetrical Harm

Research indicates that babies born before 39 weeks are more likely to have breathing, feeding and developmental problems compared to full term babies.  As a result, Rush-Copley has eliminated early deliveries before 39 weeks unless there is medical indication.


Rush-Copley holds more accreditations and disease-specific certifications than any other hospital in the Fox Valley area. This commitment to regularly and voluntarily submitting to reviews and surveys from nationally based agencies such as the Joint Commission and others demonstrates the medical center’s rigorous pursuit of ensuring that patient care practices, policies and procedures are of the highest quality possible.

For a clear and in-depth look at the subject of quality in hospital-based care, please visit the comprehensive information on this complex subject from our academic affiliate Rush University Medical Center. There you’ll find common definitions explained, ways to evaluate the information being reported on government and accrediting agency websites along with helpful links and videos designed to demystify the topic. Learn more from Rush University.